Music/Soundtrack Review # 2: Liquid Swords

2 Apr

-For the Uncensored!

With this review, I could say in two words, it’s great, and then call it a day, but that would not explain overall what GZA’s second album “Liquid Swords” meant to me, but I was just six years old when this album came out. “Liquid Swords” released on November 7th, 1995, I didn’t really listen to the Wu-Tang Clan until Wu-Tang Forever. So, when I think about this album, the RZA and his dirty beats that were made to match GZA’s words and the way his rhymes fell on a beat and skipped rope around any MC who came around him. His original name, was “Gangsta G” but spelled “J-Z-Z-A,” on the credits for “Protect your Neck.” 

           Born in Brooklyn, New York, August 22nd, In an interview with the Guardian, he explains his inspiration thoroughly: “Writing for me really started in the 70s as a young child. I used to read a lot of nursery rhymes, and I learned a lot of those rhymes word for word. I would go to an aunt’s house, and she would let me play music, and she had The Last Poets album. At that time, albums didn’t have explicit stickers on them, so some of the songs had profanity on them, and I was moved by that. I would listen to those songs, to the flow, and I’d balance it back and forth with the nursery stuff I had. A year later I moved to Staten Island [from Brooklyn]. I had a few DJs in my neighbourhood that would play music in the streets. There was no hip-hop yet, there were just DJs that were playing disco, funk and pop music, and we would gather round, go to the parks and dance and enjoy ourselves. I would often take trips from Staten Island to the south Bronx, which is originally the first place of hip-hop. I was only around 11 years old, and sometimes RZAwould come with me. The DJs and MCs there were way more advanced than the neighbourhood I was coming from. It was just a culture that I was moved by, and I knew that was my calling.” ((https://www.theguardian.com/music/musicblog/2015/jun/19/mogwai-stuart-braithwaite-interviews-wu-tang-clan-gza-atp)

What makes GZA powerful is the lyrics he espouses on each track. On some tracks you can hear a young boy talking, and the dialogue is taken directly from the dub of “Lone Wolf and Cub.” In the most famous of his lyrics, he pontificates, 

“Fake niggas get flipped
In mic fights I swing swords and cut clowns
Shit is too swift to bite you record and write it down
I flow like the blood on a murder scene, like a syringe
On some wild out shit, to insert a fiend”

            The visuals he employs is a staple of GZA’s wordplay and he was nicknamed the Genius, by his first album, Words from the Genius. Truly, if this was the first real rhymes on GZA’s debut album, it was only a blessing because this is like reading a crime novel, as it’s being told from countless hours of perfection, as it was supposed to represent how words can create visuals. 

            The second track, “Dual of the Iron Mic” includes two of the Wu-Tang members, Masta Killa and Inspectah Deck, but the opening from GZA is almost as synonymous with the way the Wu-Tang built up there cache of lyrics, but also was the foundation of every single member to step up there game post 36 Chambers album. 

“Picture bloodbaths and elevator shafts

Like these murderous rhymes tight from genuine craft

Check the print, it’s where veterans spark the letterings

Slow moving mc’s is waitin for the editin

The liquid soluble that made up the chemistry

gaseous element, that burned down your ministry

Herbal vapors, and biblical papers

Smokin exodus, every square yard is plush

Fuck the screw-faced photo sessions facial expression

Leaves impressions, try to keep a shark nigga guessin” 

            It’s where each rhyme at the end of his sentence that the rhyme, should be a half syllable, but the way each word is meant to compliment each other at the end, without being lazy, as most rappers might do today. It’s almost a rise as the first track is meant to introduce GZA, but duel of the iron mic, with Masta Killa and Inspectah Deck, allows him to set the pace of the track.             

What the third track “Living in the World Today” does is allow you to be caught off guard by the beat. RZA was working at master levels, as he captured so much of the sound and funk that you would hear in New York City. The kind of persuasive beat making skills that would take someone twenty years to learn. According to the Wu Manual, Rza used a “Emulator SP-122” where Bring the pain “was made on that machine.” “Ensoniq EPS” and an “Ensoniq EPS-16 Plus” were also RZA’s equipment at the time. (The Wu-Tang Manual. The RZA. Berkley Publishing Group. New York. 196)

GZA’s lyrics were some of the finest at the time, as the mixture of the words covered over the grimy beats were some of the best that GZA could offer. Upon its release no one had heard anything like GZA as his lyrical proficiency made sure that each syllable was used to take up most of the bar (or lyrical line):

“My rhyme gross weight vehicle combination
Was too heavy for the Chevy’s is chased out the station

            When you look at the first two lines it’s here where you see GZA’s storytelling techniques amplified, as what would combine some very difficult word play for any other rapper, makes you see that no line is wasted. “Double-edged” at the first line would compliment the rhyme at the second line where it ends at “unleaded shit.”

“Double-edged was the guillotine that beheaded it
Gassed up, fuckin with some regular unleaded shit”

            “Gassed up” is used it’s to allow some momentary breathing room, to counter the compound sentence scheme, making it a tightrope, “fuckin with some regular unleaded shit”. You can see that with this phrase almost creates a closed in line that provides a closed in rhyme, almost layered.

            The fourth track, Gold, does provide some solid lyrical word play, as it does provide more proof that GZA is constantly thinking. GZA, as he does provide some great narrative techniques to the rhyme, as this is what makes GZA and his technique, but the most poignant rhyme that can be examined is here:

It’s mandatory that I supply all my troops with mega firearms
Big apes and spread ’em out like crops on a farm
To get cream, sometimes they repaint the scene.”

            Let’s break this down. These three lines represent how each word in the lyrics are rhymes bouncing off one another. “Mandatory” jumps onto the line “spread em out” as “mega firearms” reflects “farm” in the second line. What is best to point out is that what you see in these lines is that the syllables are interwoven, as the “cream” rhymes with “scene” closing off the first two lines that spent so much time carrying so many words with half the complexity. It’s not complex at first because GZA does this so effortlessly that you don’t really listen or study the lyrics the first time.

The fifth track is one of the most defining songs of the Liquid Swords album, and the most popular song that everyone knows. “Cold World” is to me, a track that gives GZA the lyrical credibility he deserves. I can say that on “Cold World” is where we hear Inspectah Deck’s story telling capabilities too. What doesn’t surprise me is that GZA, for someone who has accomplished so much, the track still resonates, as while the opening from Lone Wolf and Cub gives us more context to “Cold War” it provides the mindset of RZA’s influences on the track. 

While the track lyrically follows a simple pattern, the simplicity behind GZA’s lyrics prove that his “half short twice strong” way of rhyming is no different than Romantic poets who didn’t use big words in order to make there point known. He seems to repeat a closed in rhyme, as he repeats compound rhymes repeated within each line. There’s so many lines to quote, and it’s often the song most GZA fans remember. 

Around the fifth track, you start to hear what the rest of the album will turn into, as many who were just listening to it, maintain the strength of the album, is the crux of both GZA and deck’s rhyme scheme. What this track represents is the 90’s, and how grimy beats and story telling lyrics were so popular, and many could learn from GZA’s technique. 

Much of his lyrics do follow the pattern around the examples I have brought that are a bridge to what the rest of the album can sound like. Much of the first few lines from the five tracks are a story that do create a tension, and mood that can put the listener into the world of GZA’s lyrics laced with RZA’s beats that give GZA his place among the greatest lyrical MC’s that many would try to copy. 

The opening, by far, is one of the best opening bars in the entirety of Hip Hop, other than Inspectah Deck’s opening for Triumph.

It was the night before New Year’s, and all through the fuckin’ projects
Not a handgun was silent, not even a Tec
Outside as I’m stuck, by enemies who put fear
And blasted on the spot before the pigs were dere
You know hoods robbers snipers new in sight, fuck blue and white
They escape before them flash the fuckin’ lights”

            What is important is the delivery, as the openings of GZA’s bars on Liquid Swords set a precedent for Hip Hop and Rap, since its inception. Even here, we see that his words are merely just another outlook on life that no other rapper has done. It’s not stringing words along together. It’s about balance. Byron seems to be what I see most in GZA, as both GZA and Lord Byron are economical poets, both separated by time and distance, but the poetry of the two men are what make these two seem so alike, as 90’s rappers are known to place rhyme and words in the same lines. 

            With the Sixth track, labels, we hear RZA remark, “you got to read the labels.” Because if you don’t read warning labels you will die. Labels are what we see on milk cartons. But not on labels. Labels don’t tell you they are going to give you a shitty deal. If there was any possibility of that, no one would make art, but if that did happen, you have to read the contracts. Labels starts out with a signature GZA line, 

“Tommy ain’t my motherfuckin’ boy
When you fake moves on a nigga you employ
We’ll all emerge off your set, now you know God damn
I show living large niggas how to flip a def jam.”

            This song originates on GZA’s and RZA’s early career in the music industry. GZA’s first album, Words from the Genius, signed to Cold Chillin, and RZA, then performing as Prince Rakeem, Tommy Boy, were dropped after poor sales. Such is the nature of the entertainment business, but GZA crafted “Labels” as a reminder of how corrupt the industry can be. Naming famous companies that don’t care about artists and what they need to be happy and maintain a career. The song does illustrate how GZA can take lines like 

GZA is not really a punchline master, but his rhymes did reflect the thought he put into it. What is interesting is to study the rhymes, “The soft comedian rap shit ain’t the rough witty, On the reel to reel it wasn’t from a tough city, Niggas be game, thinking that they lyrical surgeons
They know they microphone’s a virgin, And if you ain’t boned a mic you couldn’t hurt a bee
That’s like going to Venus driving a mercury.”

            While this passage represents the GZA’s prowess, the rhyme is not overly impressive, since the fifth track represented a crescendo, as we are journeying through GZA’s world and what it means to be an MC in early 1990’s New York. In the early 90’s, gaining reputation is through battling and making a name for themselves. But that’s almost like sword work for a MC, and sharpening his mind and sword for rap was like learning insults, and how to form it on a beat. GZA is not really known for being a punchline master, but his rhymes do reflect the thought he put into it, that do make. What is interesting is to study the rhymes, you can see the progression of the lyrical weight attached to each line.

The seventh track, 4th Chamber, is different because this does open up with the Wu-Tang Clan members doing there best to create a mood and atmosphere, and while the Clan do an excellent job, they are merely saving the best for last when GZA arrives, The banks of G, all CREAM downs a vet Money feed good, opposites off the set” as he makes his prescience known, as his wealth represents the strength for veterans.
“It ain’t hard to see, my seeds need God-degree I got mouths to feed,” as he speaks of what his children need out of the world with knowledge for the mind, body and soul, “unnecessary beef is more cows to breed” while speaking about the enemies he may face in the world, when it comes to his experience with competition. As an aside, God, when said by the Wu-Tang Clan are represented by black men and women believing they are Gods, from the Nation of Five Percenters. Created by Clarence 13X, he narrowed down the tenants of Islam, as it broke away to help the people become righteous and use logic over emotion. 

The Eighth Track, Shadowboxin, presents a beat that is often more associated with jazz, as it’s meant to help provide a cadence for both Method man and GZA. Method man, in his earliest days, was developing his taste for the commercial medium. But GZA, as he is the smartest member of the clan, “Form like Voltron he would be the head” as it provided GZA takes his time, marinating his lyrics over RZA’s beat.

            As an aside, the beat, if you hear it, it does present how much of his style would be then later copied by other well known producers. Sampling is part of the Hip-Hop and rap producing community. The beats are not meant to go on forever, like a guitar solo would present a way to build tension with the singing. Much like Rage against the Machines guitars were almost akin to a scratching needle on a record. 

            Method Man does provide much of the template for his release, as it is rather different for Method Man. Method Man is deliberately rhyming slowly, as it’s almost like he follows the kick of the drum with the beat he’s rhyming over. But it’s GZA who does illustrate much of the clan’s origins when it comes to there background in battling MC’s “I slayed MC’s back in the rec room era” as he does provide some insight to other MC’s who don’t get it “Check these non visual niggas with tapes and a portrait” as he uses rhymes like a gun “before I use the rhyme RZA scratch off the serial.”

            It’s a track that upon hearing it repeatedly, the rhymes were perfected as much of the second half of the album is pitched to represent someone taking a shower. Like GZA’s trying to impress us because Method Man would become the face of the group for the first half of the clans career. 

            The 9th track, Killah Hills/10304, goes back to GZA’s importance as a storyteller. I would argue that without GZA’s story telling skills that carries the world of Shaolin within his rhymes, most of the clan would not have made it past there first albums. “ Restaurants on a stake-out So order the food to take out Chaos, outside a spark steakhouse” as it’s back to the grungy gritty beats Liquid Swords is remembered by. The rhymes detailing a deal gone wrong, as it’s almost from the hit men who are doing the job that a deal gone bad. “Maintain the power, I feel the deal’s gone sour Nigga missed the wedding, late a fuckin’ half hour” GZA paints a portrait that continues to detail his own sordid world of filth that from a bystander would take his crime thriller with fiction level quality. And his man who bought land from Tony Starks While he was contractin’ bricklayin jobs in city parks.” Ghostface Killah would take on the moniker of Tony Starks, as that would carry his career for 25 years.

            I’m going to skip over the tenth track as I am not interested in that track as much, as the track flexes Ghostface Killah, and the eleventh track is not my favorite, but the most important rhymes from GZA are not found on there. These two songs are not bad but do not reflect the strength of GZA’s lyrical swordplay. It’s almost like hitting tennis balls for him.

            The Twelfth Track, I Gotcha Back, is probably one of the most notable of GZA’s songs in his timeline. The first stanza of GZA’s lyrics prove that much of the criminal aspect he was building up to, is leading to the twelfth track, and the stanza is presented in full:

I was always taught my do’s and don’ts
For do’s I did, and for don’ts, I said I won’t
I’m from Brooklyn, a place where stars are born
Streets are shot up, apartment buildings are torn
And ripped up, stripped up, shacked up and backed up
From fiends, cause the bosses on the scene, they got it cracked up
Kids are slinging in my lobby
Little Steve and Bobby
Getting paid but it’s a life-threatening hobby
Yeah, they still play hide-and-seek
The fiends seek for the crack, and they hide and let the cops peep
Grown folks say they should be out on their own
Before the gangs come and blow up their mom’s home
Because they lifestyle is hectic, so fucking hectic
Blaow! Blaow! Blaow! Bullets are ejected
My lifestyle was so far from well
Could’ve wrote a book with a title “Age 12 and Going Through Hell”
Then I realized the plan
I’m trapped in a deadly video game, with just one man
So I don’t only watch my back, I watch my front
Cause it’s the niggas who front, they be pulling stunts
Back on the Ave of Lavonia and Bristol with a pistol
Sticking up Pamela and Crystal
You know your town is dangerous when you see the strangest
Kid come home from doing the bid and nothing changes
What is the meaning of CRIME (what?)
Is it Criminals Robbing Innocent Motherfuckers Everytime?
Little shorties take walks to the schoolyard
Trying to solve the puzzles to why is life so hard
Then as soon as they reached the playground, blaow!
Shots ring off and now one of them lay down
It’s so hard to escape the gunfire
I wish I could rule it out like an umpire
But it’s an everlasting game, and it never cease to exist
Only the players change, so

What we see from this paragraph is that somehow, the rhyme is like a threaded barrel in a gun. The lyrics are tight and they bounce off the next line, as the syllables prove they are providing a dance, as someone would move there hips on the dance floor, except he’s using words to produce the inflection in his voice too. 

Now, I won’t be covering the thirteenth track “B.I.B.L.E.” or “Basic Instructions Before Leaving Earth” because GZA does not appear on the track at all. I would probably discuss that alone, since it’s Killah Priests most famous track. I think the importance of GZA’s Liquid Swords still holds influential over hip hop heads, and proves that rap did indeed rely on lyrics to tell a story and engaging enough to provide multiple listens.

            What keeps me invested as rappers as poets, as Byron was to his peers, GZA’s Liquid Swords is a mashup of culture trapped within sound can take listeners on a new journey. While I only mentioned one relation between Rappers and Poets, rap, in the 90’s, is personified in how technique and voice match the way the rhymes and poems do help create genuine authentic pieces of art. 

            This is a must own for anyone who wants to investigate rap as an art form, and the WU-TANG Clan took rap to places the next generation can’t go. 

-Louis Bruno is the author of more than 15 books, including, The Michael Project, The Michael Project: Book 2: The Lost Children of Eve, Thy Kingdom Come, The Disintegrating Bloodline, Apocalypse Soldier, Hierarchy of Dwindling Sheep. His books can be found on Amazon, Barnes and Noble, and Lulu. He can be found on Gab, https://gab.com/thereallouistbruno, Minds https://www.minds.com/lbruno8063/, and Parlerhttps://parler.com/profile/therealLouistbruno/posts. Instagram @lbrruno8063 and @louisbrunoofficialbook. He has written for the Intellectual Conservative and Ephemere. Also, he writes on https://louisbruno.substack.com, where you can support him directly. His latest, Come Home, Young One, a dark fantasy novel is out now at Lulu.com. Link is here: https://www.lulu.com/en/us/shop/louis-bruno/come-home-young-one/hardcover/product-pw8q7z.html?page=1&pageSize=4.  His next series, City of Sand, will be available sometime this year.

Also available on podcast too: 

www.breaker.audio/the-real-louis-t-brunos-blog

https://www.google.com/podcasts?feed=aHR0cHM6Ly9hbmNob3IuZm0vcy81MDA5ZDY3MC9wb2RjYXN0L3Jzcw==

https://pca.st/504t7jxr

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